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Archive for the 'Sustainable Food' Category

EATING RIGHT: AMERICA’S TEN HEALTHIEST SUPERMARKET CHAINS

Posted in Health Watch, Healthy Food, News Brief, Sustainable Food on November 9th, 2008

HEALTH,COM RATES THE GROCERY STORES YOU SHOULD ADD TO YOUR SHOPPING LIST

1. Whole Foods (279 stores in 38 states and Washington, D.C.
2. Safeway (1,700-plus stores nationwide)
3. Harris Teeter (176 stores in the Southeast)
4. Trader Joe’s (300-plus stores in 23 states and Washington, D.C.)
5. Hannaford (165-plus stores in the Northeast)
6. Albertsons (529 stores in the West, owned by SuperValu)
7. Food Lion (1,300 stores in the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic)
8. Publix Super Markets (952 stores in the Southeast)
9. Pathmark (141 stores in the Mid-Atlantic)
10. SuperTarget (239 stores in 21 states, primarily Texas and Florida)

Learn why these stores are considered America’s healthiest supermarkets

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NEWS WATCH! WHOLE FOODS MARKET REFOCUSES – - STRESSES VALUE

Posted in Cool Products, Corporate Responsibility, Eco -Chic, Ethical Business, Healthy Food, News Brief, Sustainable Food on August 3rd, 2008

COMPANY MAKING “A STRONG EFFORT” TO CHALLENGE ITS COMPETITORS ON PRICE

wholefoodsa1.jpegThe sketchy economy, high cost of fuel and skittish job market are taking their toll on Whole Foods Markets, as once loyal customers look elsewhere in search of deep discounts on necessary food and household items.

To combat the losses, the extent of which are unclear, Whole Foods has announced a line of lower-priced generic products, a staple of traditional supermarkets, together with deep discounts on many existing items. The goal here is to make the chain synonymous with value, a tough task after years of being known for upscale gourmet items.

Only time will tell how this works out. Hopefully company management finds a way to serve both masters effectively without destroying what it is that makes the Whole Foods experience special.

Read On

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EU PONDERS BAN ON GENETICALLY MODIFIED CORN

Posted in Eco Warriors, Gen. Modified Foods, Health Watch, News Brief, Sustainable Food on November 26th, 2007

SUCH A DECISION WOULD INTENSIFY THE CONTINUING BATTLE OVER GENETICALLY MODIFIED CORN

gen corn.jpgEuropean Union environmental officials have determined that two kinds of genetically modified corn could harm butterflies, affect food chains and disturb life in rivers and streams, and they have proposed a ban on the sale of the seeds, which are made by DuPont Pioneer, Dow Agrosciences and Syngenta.

The preliminary decisions are circulating within the European Commission, which has the final say. Some officials there are skeptical of a ban that would upset the powerful biotechnology industry and could exacerbate tensions with important trading partners like the United States. The seeds are not available on the European market for cultivation.

MORE….

Source: NYT

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STUDY: HEALTHY FOOD MAY BE TOO EXPENSIVE FOR MANY LOW-INCOME FAMILIES TO AFFORD

Posted in Health Watch, Healthy Food, News Brief, Sustainable Food on November 3rd, 2007

A LOW-INCOME FAMILY WOULD HAVE TO DEVOTE 43% TO 70% OF ITS FOOD BUDGET TO FRUITS AND VEGETABLES TO MEET THE 2005 DIETARY GUIDELINES

colorfuldiet1.jpgWe tend to blame the obesity epidemic in the United States on people making the wrong lifestyle choices — for example, eating a Big Mac instead of carrot sticks or Twinkies instead of an apple.

New research shows, however, that the price of healthy food may be too high for many low-income families to afford, and experts say the government needs to step in.

A new study published in the journal of the American Dietetic Association finds that a low-income family would have to devote 43 to 70 percent of its food budget to fruits and vegetables to meet the 2005 Dietary Guidelines, which recommends five to nine servings of fruits and vegetables a day.

“Most Americans fall short of the recommended servings,” says Milton Stokes, a registered dietitian and a spokesman for the American Dietetic Association.

“The lower their economic status, the more of their income is spent toward food,” he says. “Someone making $20,000 is going to spend a larger percentage of dollars on food than someone making $200,000, even if they buy the same amount.”

Currently, researchers say that American families spend 15 to 18 percent of their budget on fruits and vegetables.

“It seems unlikely that consumers would be able to increase their spending on fruits and vegetables by 200 percent to 400 percent without substantial changes elsewhere in the food budget, or from other household expenditures,” the authors of the report note.

MORE….

Source: ABC Health News

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AS GM FOOD APPROACHES 75% OF ALL FOOD CONSUMED, IS THERE A CAUSE FOR CONCERN?

Posted in Gen. Modified Foods, Health Watch, Sustainable Food, Toxin Alert! on September 24th, 2007

AN OVERVIEW OF GENETICALLY ENGINEERED VS. NON-GENETICALLY ENGINEERED FOOD INGREDIENTS

tomatoes.jpg The sides are drawn in the battle for your food dollar, with foods containing genetically modified ingredients on one side and foods free from genome manipulation on the other.

For those unsure of the difference, Genetically Modified foods are foodstuffs that have been produced from organisms, which have had their genome, or hereditary information, altered through a process known as genetic engineering.

Currently, the most common genetically modified foods are those derived from plants, with soybeans, corn, canola, cottonseed oil and wheat topping the list. According to Wikipedia, the source of most of the date in this posting, fully 89% of the planted area of soybeans, 83 percent of cotton, and 61 percent of maize are producing plants, which have been genetically modified.

Future plans call for the creation of bananas genetically modified to protect consumers against disease, fish metabolically engineered to mature more quickly, and plants which have had their makeup tweaked to produce new plastics with unique properties.

While all of this sounds very encouraging, there is something about consuming food, which man has messed with that just does not sit that well with me. Maybe I’m just old fashion on this point. But then, I also take issue with poultry that greedy factory farmers have injected with growth hormones to fatten up in the hope of increasing their return on investment.

While I’m pretty certain that I am not alone in wanting my food to be as pure as possible, and not the end result of millions of dollars worth of genetic experimentation, we are definitely in the minority. Currently better than 75% of all foods sold here in the United States contains ingredient that have been genetically modified.

So, as a haven for like minds, I have included a link to what I believe to be the most comprehensive list of what products are and what are not genetically modified. Consider printing this list and taking it with you the next time you go to the market.

Maybe, by combined action, we can forestall the day when all food is the product of genetic manipulation.

-LIB

JUMP TO THE LIST

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TEN EASY WAYS TO EAT LOCALLY

Posted in Conscious Actions, Eco -Chic, Ethical Living, Healthy Food, Miscellaneous, Sustainable Food on August 5th, 2007

HEALTHY DOES NOT HAVE TO COME FROM THE OTHER END OF THE PLANET.

ColorfulDiet.jpgMuch space has been devoted recently, both here and throughout the green themed world, to the organic versus local discussion.

While it appears that each side has it’s benefits and drawbacks, we would like to adjoin the discussion, at least for today, and share the following article from the archives at Lime, as it was originally posted in October of last year by freelance jourrnalist, Rachele Kanigel.

-Lib

    TEN EASY WAYS TO EAT LOCALLY

Source: Lime

Brake for farm stands.
If hand-lettered signs saying “Fresh Corn” or “Sweet Cherries Up Ahead” tempt you, pull over. Roadside stands are a great way to buy freshly picked produce, often directly from the farmer.

Join a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farm.
Many farms offer produce subscriptions that allow you to purchase weekly or monthly boxes of produce, flowers, and other farm products You’ll get whatever’s being harvested that week and know that you’re directly supporting a local farm. To find a farm near you click on Local Harvest

Shop at farmers markets.
Most communities have at least one local farmers market and many venues now operate yearround. To find a farmers market near you, go to the U. S. Department of Agriculture’s clickable map, which features a state-by-state list of certified markets.

Eat with the seasons.
Build your diet around what’s growing locally. Many Eastern cultures believe this is the healthiest way to eat.

Stock up and preserve.
For generations, people have been canning, drying, and freezing food for winter—and our foremothers didn’t even have Ziplock bags! For more information on how to preserve food go to the National Center for Home Food Preservation’s Web site.

Build relationships with local meat producers.
Many farmers sell beef, pork, and fowl products directly to consumers through farmers markets and Web sites. If you’ve got a relationship with a local butcher, ask where the meat comes from—and encourage them to do business with local producers.

For the rest of the list and for other timely and relevant postings, check out Lime’s tremendous portal.

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GETTING MORE COLOR AND HEALTH INTO OUR DIETS

Posted in Conscious Actions, Health Watch, Sustainable Food on July 15th, 2007

LEAVING THE WHITES (SUGAR AND FLOUR) BEHIND

ColorfulDiet.jpg In recent years, I have made a conscious effort to minimize my intake of the dreaded whites; white flour, white sugar and the various sugar substitutes.

The outcome of this often difficult process is that I consistantly feel healthier and am not plagued with as many nagging bugs, colds etc., as I have been many times in the past.

In conceiving this website, I realised how critical it is that we as citizens of this planet have options. Health options are a critical part of this. If any of you come across something that helps us towards that goal, please drop me a line in the comment section of this website.

Meantime, Happy eating.

-LIB

Some years ago, I furtively eyed a couple in a grocery line buying fresh lemons and garlic and tried to imagine the exotic food they would make with such bonafide ingredients. Back then I mostly ate the Standard American Diet (SAD)—prepackaged foods staunchly set in a pale, even ghostly tradition. What nutrition there was in this food had been added back in, in the form of “enrichment.” And in lieu of real flavor, the food was heavily laced with fat, sugar and salt—a cheap way, I now see, for manufacturers to keep consumers coming back for more.

When I left white flour behind 15 years ago, it was a deliberate ploy for better health. At first, I continued to crave white flour products. Months down the road, though, I was amazed when a standard issue quesadilla proffered by a friend brought no delight, but instead tasted pasty and overly doughy. I hadn’t quite learned how to mince a fresh clove of garlic—or squeeze juice and scrape zest from a lemon—but I was on my way.

I’m pleased to report a similar epiphany around sugar and its fake counterparts, all of them enticing substances I never thought I would leave behind. But here I am, light years from the land of the white crystal and faux food, eating with the seasons and enjoying the flavors of vegetables and fruits picked at their peak.

Clearly, the mother lode of nutrients and fiber in my colorful, seasonal diet has steadied me. No more do simple sugars and refined carbohydrates jerk my blood sugar levels around like I’m a performer in some bizarre circus. Rather, I go through my days on an even keel and have more energy than I did 20 years ago. And extra pounds that dogged me for years are slipping away.

MORE….

Source: E-Magazine

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ORGANIC V. LOCAL

Posted in Health Watch, Sustainable Food on June 14th, 2007

ONE PERSON’S PERSPECTIVE ON THE FOOD TOPIC OF THE MOMENT

tomato.jpgAs you can probably imagine, I’m a sucker for farmer’s markets. Even (or, perhaps, especially) when I’m in another country, miles from my kitchen, I love wandering through the rolls of stalls, admiring the ripe, colorful produce and imagining what dishes I’d concoct with them. And Atlanta happens to have what is supposedly one of the country’s biggest farmer’s markets-the Georgia State Farmer’s Market. I’d been wanting to go since I moved here last year, and this past weekend, we finally decided to take the trip. Open every day and boasting 150 acres of purveyors, it sounds like one of those places that chefs go to at dawn to pick out the ripest produce, haggling over produce prices and quality with the farmers who grew it. I imagined it must be like the Hunt’s Point Market in New York, a place I always regret never having visited while I lived there.

I’d like to be able to tell you about all of the wonderful organic produce we scored, trucked from nearby farms by happy, independent farmers striving to preserve greater Atlanta from suburban sprawl. But alas, it didn’t exactly meet my expectations.

MORE….

Source: Lime

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