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NOT ALL TOXIC FOOD COMES FROM CHINA

POISONS, PESTICIDES OR MERELY DIRTY OR DECOMPOSED WE NEED MORE FOOD INSPECTION, NOT LESS.

taintedFood_hmed1p.hmedium.jpg This story in a text book example of bad timing comes hot on the heels of the announcement several days ago that the FDA is planning to close at least half of the laboratories charged with ensuring the safety of our food supply.

If this so-called cost-cutting measure / thinly-disguised gift to the food industry is allowed to take place, the day will come, and it is not that far away, when we will only be sure of a product’s purity if we grew it ourselves.

Maybe this is why so many of my baby boomer friends have recently begun raising much of their own produce?

Think about it. Growing your own kills two birds with one stone, it guarantees a pretty consistent supply of poison- free, pesticide-free produce and it solves for once and for all the lingering carbon issue, which surrounds so much organic food today.

Now if I only knew the first thing about gardening. (SIGH)

-LIB

Mexican cantaloupe irrigated with water from sewage-tainted rivers. Candy laced with lead. Chinese toothpaste is not the only concern for U.S. consumers wary of the health risks posed by imported goods.

Producers in other developing nations are big violators of basic food safety standards, even as they woo consumers with a growing appetite for foods like pickled mangoes from India and winter-season fruits and vegetables from Mexico.

China, already under suspicion as the source of tainted toothpaste, contaminated fish and toxic medicine, had the largest number of violations in the past 12 months, with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration rejecting 1,901 shipments of food or cosmetics. But India and Mexico weren’t far behind, with inspectors rejecting 1,787 and 1,560 shipments, respectively.

The biggest reasons? Foods that are unapproved or contain poisons and pesticides. Some are simply dirty, with inspectors finding that the shipment “appears to consist in whole or in part of a filthy, putrid, or decomposed substance or be otherwise unfit for food.”

And those are just the problems that are caught. FDA inspectors only have the money and resources to check about 1 percent of the 8.9 million imported food shipments a year. Many of those inspections target problem products from problem nations, like Indian relishes or Mexican cantaloupe.

The FDA banned all cantaloupe from Mexico in 2002 after four salmonella outbreaks traced to the fruit killed two people in the United States and hospitalized at least 18 others

MORE BAD NEWS….

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